Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Looking at What They Can’t See
Looking at What They Can’t See

(Mirar lo que no ver—from a drawing by Goya.)

Messy hair, laughing, drinking, they go well together, in a dark, red haze,—like in some convivial basement party in hell.

This is Rich Ziade’s Basement Bin celebration, at Bobby’s place in Bay Ridge. Messy hair, laughing—drinking in a dark, red haze.

This celebration is of a video collection itself a celebration of life, a celebration of human beings in moments of extreme self-expression, a celebration—of some pretty weird shit, caught on, fabricated for, and otherwise lovingly exposed in front of, the video camera.

So, Looking at what they can’t see: in Goya’s drawing people are taking pleasure in broad daylight looking into a dark box, out of which emerges the smiling head of a kind of private exhibitionist; in the basement bin we are in the dark, also in a kind of a box, heads smiling, and looking at figures acting out in an illuminated box in another kind of private exhibitionism.

I think also of Godard’s remark about cinema being a place where an individual joins the many to be alone, and TV as being a place where people go to be alone to join the many.

Right, and then there’s the basement. There’s something down there.

* * *

Bay Ridge, Brooklyn: November 2014.

Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Looking at What They Can’t See
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Bay Ridge, Brooklyn 2014
Looking at What They Can’t See

(Mirar lo que no ver—from a drawing by Goya.)

Messy hair, laughing, drinking, they go well together, in a dark, red haze,—like in some convivial basement party in hell.

This is Rich Ziade’s Basement Bin celebration, at Bobby’s place in Bay Ridge. Messy hair, laughing—drinking in a dark, red haze.

This celebration is of a video collection itself a celebration of life, a celebration of human beings in moments of extreme self-expression, a celebration—of some pretty weird shit, caught on, fabricated for, and otherwise lovingly exposed in front of, the video camera.

So, Looking at what they can’t see: in Goya’s drawing people are taking pleasure in broad daylight looking into a dark box, out of which emerges the smiling head of a kind of private exhibitionist; in the basement bin we are in the dark, also in a kind of a box, heads smiling, and looking at figures acting out in an illuminated box in another kind of private exhibitionism.

I think also of Godard’s remark about cinema being a place where an individual joins the many to be alone, and TV as being a place where people go to be alone to join the many.

Right, and then there’s the basement. There’s something down there.

* * *

Bay Ridge, Brooklyn: November 2014.

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